Pages Navigation Menu

Featured Articles

Cascabel rejects development

By | 8 comments

CASCABEL —  A proposed residential community would mean big business for Benson but the people living north along the San Pedro River in Cascabelwant none of it. The Villages at Vigneto, sited just south of Benson, would potentially boost the population of the small town of 5,000 people to over 70,000 in the space of 20 to 25 years. The development has come under fire for the potential damage it could cause to the water resources of the area, chiefly to the San Pedro River and the habitats that rely on it. For the people living north of the city like Anna Lands and Alex Binford-Walsh, it means so much more than that. “We are really going to get squeezed,” said Lands. “The people from there are going to want to come here.” The area around Cascabel is very...

Read More

Gasolinazo: Gas crisis in Mexico crosses the border

By | 0 comments

Angela Ayala Gonzalez, like many other residents in San Luis, Sonora, and Nogales, Sonora, is struggling even more to make ends meet in Mexico after a 20 percent increase in gas prices following a decision to eliminate state oil subsidies by the Mexican government. Gas stations across the Mexico border have shut down their pumps in reaction to the gasolinazo, or gasoline blow as it is being called. The increase in gas prices sparked major protests across the border towns, including San Luis Rio Colorado and Nogales. President Enrique Peña Nieto said in a message to the nation that the rise in fuel prices is a result of the rise in international prices and that it is “a difficult change” but necessary to guarantee economic stability. However, during Nieto’s 2015 New Year speech, Nieto promised there would be “…. no...

Read More

Arizona’s toughest captured Dillinger from right field

By | 0 comments

Let us remember Frank Eyman, considered to be one of the toughest individuals to ever put on a badge. The former Bisbee baseball player and long-time Arizona lawman is most known for his capturing of notorious “Public Enemy Number One,” John Dillinger and his gang, but beyond the badge he was much more. Baseball enthusiast and Bisbee native Mike Anderson first came upon the name Eyman during his 10-year career working for the Pima County Sheriff’s Office. “Knowing there was a baseball player in Bisbee by the name of Frank Eyman, I decided to look at records,” Anderson said. He became the foremost expert of Eyman and his effort in capturing of Dillinger. Eyman was born on March 8, 1898, in Lemont, Illinois. At 19 years old, he joined the U.S. Army and was assigned to the 17th Calvary...

Read More

House development challenges Benson, San Pedro River

By | 0 comments

BENSON — The future of the 70,000-person residential community Villages at Vigneto lives or dies on a single decision by the Army Corps of Engineers, potentially dooming the San Pedro River or reversing the fortunes of Benson.  However, not a single person lives in the community, because it doesn’t exist just yet and the San Pedro and Benson are dependent on one big “if.” That “if” reaches much farther than the just the city limits or banks of the river, as this development south of Benson would make it the largest city in Cochise County and transform the area from a sleepy, rural county to Arizona’s newest housing goldmine. For those who see a change in fortune, it is a huge boon. For those who appreciate the status quo, it’s a travesty. The crux of the issue lies underground....

Read More

Contamination from decades of uranium mining lingers on Navajo land

By | 0 comments

  On Navajo Nation land, the ghost of the mining industry’s past still haunts the native people who live there. It began in the 1940s when the Navajo land was — and still is — a hotbed for uranium.  The new weapon-manufacturing industry brought a new opportunity for jobs among the natives living on the land, but it came at a cost. Now, government agencies and researchers from across the country work toward cleaning the hundreds of abandoned mines left after four decades of mining ended in 1986. A goal is to understand the effects that decades-long uranium contamination has on the Navajo people. The contamination effects over half of the tribe’s population. With 300,000 people, the Navajo tribe is the second largest Native American group in the U.S., according to recent U.S. Census data. Of those 300,000, some 156,000...

Read More

Homeless youth find help in Tucson

By | 0 comments

  According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, Arizona is the fifth worst in the United States for child homelessness. Every year, more than 62,000 children throughout Arizona are displaced through no fault of their own. Homeless youth are four times more likely to drop out of school. Youth on their Own in Tucson works to eliminate barriers to education for homeless youth by proving them with financial assistance, guidance and security. Click here for a video...

Read More

Tucson Festival of Books returns for 9th year

By | 1 comment

The books are back in town. The Tucson Festival of Books returns to the University of Arizona campus Saturday and Sunday for the ninth year. Hannah Isaac, an AmeriCorps volunteer with the Festival of Books, says they are expecting 135,000 people to attend this year. The festival will have over 350 authors involved of all different genres, including Molly Yeh, Sam Sykes, Adam Rex, and Lisa See. The current U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera will be doing a poetry reading at this year’s festival. There will be workshops and exhibitions as well, including Science City where kids can learn about science and do hands-on experiments. “We’ve always had a really big audience, but as the festival continues to grow and we get different authors, bigger names, we definitely see a lot more traffic,” Isaac said. “We have a...

Read More

Native American women have something to say

By | 0 comments

Weaving through downtown streets during the Tucson Women’s March, an organized group of 200 people held homemade signs and shouted, “We are still here!” The group on Jan. 21 represented more than 15 indigenous nations ranging from Canada and Alaska to Mexico, although most were Tohono O’odham women from Southern Arizona. “It sounds like this really peachy experience — that we had a very visible group,” said Gabriella Cázares-Kelly, a Tohono O’odham woman and community organizer. “(But) even though we were ‘200 strong,’ we were still shafted.” About 15,000 women marched, yet O’odham women were still left in the shadows, she said. They had no part in organizing presentations, prayers, songs or speakers. “Afterward, I saw the agenda and my heart fell when I saw that there was no native presence in it whatsoever,” Cázares-Kelly said. But this isn’t anything new....

Read More

Legislative Roundup: More guns and some not so nice things

By | 0 comments

PHOENIX – By mid-day in the beginning of March, it’s already too warm to spend much time outside in Phoenix, but you wouldn’t know that at the State Legislature. Senators, representatives, interns and pages are all working from 9 a.m. to well into the evening, blocking off most of the sun-lit hours. Gov. Doug Ducey has finally started signing bills into law, and the late-night marathon sessions have given legislators dozens of bills to read every day. Not So Nice Things Every legislator can flip his or her laptop open on the House or Senate floor, hook up to the wifi, and surf the web during sessions. From the outsider, it looks like they’re probably reading bills, looking up the schedule or seeing how they’re going to get free lunch that day. However, according to the blocked websites through the legislator’s wifi,...

Read More

Local librarian encourages reading through fun and innovative ways

By | 0 comments

“X, O, C, H, I, Q, U, E, T, Z, A, L … Xochiquetzal,” said Nicola, the uncertain contestant. “I truly can’t believe it, but you’re right!” announced librarian Lupita Chavez. The room full of appalled bar patrons started to clap, cheer and clink their beer glasses together as they came to terms with the young lady spelling such an abstract word this far into the game. “These events are different — I mean, a spelling bee in a bar?” Tap & Bottle co-owner Rebecca Stafford said. “I love it. It brings people who are avid spellers out, but also a lot of my patrons who are hanging out and think, ‘Why not?’” This is just one of the fun ideas Pima County librarian Karen Greene has brought to the Tucson community to encourage reading among children and adults, which has...

Read More

A student with a dream gets her chance

By | 0 comments

  Her mother started packing their suitcases as little 4-year-old Marygrace watched by the door with her big brown eyes, curious as to what’s going on. Today, Marygrace Ghio-Rodriguez stands tall and slim at 5 feet 6 with a sandy complexion. Her shoulder-length raven brown hair streams over her back. She gives off a full energy of confidence. Now 18, she majors in anthropology at the University of Arizona. As a native Peruvian, she speaks Spanish fluently. Ghio-Rodriguez is not a U.S. citizen. She is part of the Dreamer generation, children whose parents brought them to the country when they were very young. Her parents still aren’t citizens, and her college hopes depend upon Obama administration rules that got her into UA — rules that are now up in the air under President Trump. According to an American Immigration Council fact sheet, only...

Read More

Many Arizona students underprepared for college

By | 1 comment

Are Arizona students prepared for college? Recent data says no. The 2016 “Condition of College & Career Readiness” from the ACT testing organization shows Arizona behind the national average in all categories: English, reading, math and science. Only 23 percent of Arizona students meet the benchmarks in all four subjects, compared to 26 percent of students nationally. The 2014-2015 Department of Education’s State Report Card divides students into four categories in regard to the two measures the state used to measure performance, AIMS and AzMERIT tests. English proficiency was tested in grades 9, 10 and 11 with disappointing results. Less than a third of students in each grade passed the test. In the 11th grade section, 51 percent of the students tested were at the lowest performance level. Math scores weren’t any better. Just 32 percent of students passed...

Read More

A new bill could pave the way to gold

By | 0 comments

Another year, another bill to legitimize gold and silver as legal tender in Arizona. For the past half a decade, Arizona State legislators have proposed bills stemming from concerns that the paper money printed by the Federal Reserve Bank is losing value. All of these bills do fairly well in both the House and Senate, but consistently get beaten down late in the process – usually with vetoes from the governor. This year, the bill is a little different than it has been. It focuses more on the taxation of the gold and silver and less on the actual usage of gold and silver at your neighborhood market. “This is merely removing a wrongly attached capital gain tax,” Doug Ardt, a vocal member of Arizona constitutional advocates who manages the website Arizona Sound Money Act, said. “The state isn’t...

Read More

Legislative Roundup: Riots and mariachi bands

By | Comments Off on Legislative Roundup: Riots and mariachi bands

PHOENIX – The Arizona State Legislature doesn’t usually meet when they don’t have to. This is the same legislature that left early to grab dinner on Valentines Day. But, against the trend, legislators came in bright and early on Presidents Day Monday morning, and, once again upending the norm, they came into work with a mariachi band. Rep. @CesarChavezAZ lends his impressive voice to the mariachi band. pic.twitter.com/eKW2vUwzOW — Rachel Leingang (@rachelleingang) February 20, 2017 The mariachi band even played the National Anthem at the House of Representatives, where representatives are worried mold might be causing headaches during the work day. The Department of Administration didn’t find any mold, and honestly, it could just be the legislation causing the headaches. Time to Play Arizona students are getting closer to having a required full 50 minutes of “unstructured recess” with House Bill...

Read More

Will the Women’s March on Washington become the next women’s movement?

By | Comments Off on Will the Women’s March on Washington become the next women’s movement?

  The day after his inauguration, women across the globe had a message for President Donald Trump: we will not be silent. The Women’s March on Washington moved millions of women into the streets, dominated the news cycles and elicited an angry tweet from the president. But will it have the power to create lasting social movement? Women’s marches on every continent drew 2.5 million worldwide, and the impressive turnout has many optimistic about the march’s ability to evolve into an enduring opposition movement. Yet others predict it will fizzle out like the Equal Rights Amendment and Occupy Wall Street movements. Elizabeth Sanders, a Cornell University professor whose research focuses on American politics and social movements, said she sees early indications the passion generated by the march will flicker out rather than spark an effective resistance. Sanders campaigned for the Equal...

Read More