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Bordering neighbors impact local economy

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Mexican visitors influence Tucson’s economy. Year round, shoppers come from Sonora, Mexico, to the United States to seek deals and spend money. On average, they spend about $1 billion in Tucson alone, which has a big impact on the local economy. About 22 million Mexico visitors come to Arizona each year with the main purpose to shop, studies show. The number spikes around holidays, such as Black Friday after Thanksgiving and Easter, and back-to-school season, said Felipe Garcia, executive vice president for Visit Tucson. When those holidays hit, parking lots are filled with Sonora license plates, and shoppers spend on average $1,000-$5,000. “The Mexican shopper is particularly a big spender here in our community,”  said Juan Padres, economic development and international trade specialist for the City of Tucson. “We’re the largest metro city closest to the Arizona-Sonora border, so...

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Arizona child poverty rates edging downwards

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Albert Alan lived in poverty as a teenager. This past May 2017 graduated with three degrees from the University of Arizona. Alan knew that education was his honorable way out of destitution. Alan is now a medical student at UA with hopes his medical degree will allow him to be voice of the undeserved. “When I was homeless I had no access to healthcare. I saw first hand the dark side of America and knew that America was better then this,” said Alan. Alan, a Latino, is just one of millions nationally who experienced homelessness as a child. Eighty-six percent of children living in poverty are minorities. African American 22 percent, Asian American 13 percent, Latino 24 percent, Native American 33 percent, White 14 percent. About 15 million, one out of five, of children in the United States live below...

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White Mountain Apache Tribe decreases suicides, attempts

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Native American youth are killing themselves at alarming rates, but one Arizona tribe is working to reverse these trends. Nationally, suicide is prevalent in middle-age white men, but among Native Americans, 40 percent of those who die by suicide are between the ages of 15 and 24. Along with non-Hispanic whites, the Native American whites the Native American population suicide rates are double compared to any other race. Suicide rates peak during adolescence and young adulthood in Native American communities, then decrease significantly after early adulthood. “Youth suicide is the single biggest human loss a family or community can experience, “Erik Stegman, the communications associate for the Center for Native American Youth said. “It is destroying Native American and Alaska Native Communities.” However, The White Mountain Apache Tribe has decreased suicide deaths and attempts due to a comprehensive suicide...

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Unwanted horses of the West

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  President Trump’s 2018 appropriations bill suggests changing a 1971 act of Congress protecting wild horses from slaughter, and cuts the Wild Horse and Burro program by 12 percent. If passed, it will allow for the unlimited sale and slaughter of these American icons of the West. Wild horses are protected by an act of Congress from 1971, deeming them “living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West” that “enrich the lives of the American people.” Yet, the U.S. government is rounding them up by the thousands and holding them on government storage lands, and spending millions to do it. The biggest opponent of wild horses is livestock farmers, who want them to stop grazing on the public lands so their cattle and sheep will have more grass to eat. The Bureau of Land Management spent over...

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Music may affect the way you shop, especially during the holiday season

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Frosty the snowman Was a jolly happy soul… It’s that time of the year again where people can order their favorite holiday drink from Starbucks or scratch off an item on the list for holiday shopping. But, it’s also that time of the year where the holiday jingles may not be too jolly after all. After a recent study by a clinical psychologist, Linda Blair from the UK, exploded across the internet, the question is does holiday music really have the potential to harm a person’s mental health and increase stress during the holidays? According to Blair, listening to holiday music on repeat while driving or in a store may induce stress by acting as a reminder of everything people have yet to finish before the holiday arrives. With a corncob pipe and a button nose And two eyes...

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UA Museum of Art collection is priceless

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  In a building that can take you around the world and through time within hours, the permanent collection of the University of Arizona Museum of Art Archive of Visual Arts strategically begins to build one-of-a-kind exhibitions each year. The UA Museum of Art is the permanent home to over 6,000 pieces, from paintings, photographs, sculptures, and more. This does not include the archive collection, which consists of letters, papers, sketchbooks, and other things that were a part of the artistic process. With the permanent collection, the archive collection, and pieces on loan, the creation of the exhibitions begins. The first exhibition occurred in 1924; created by UA professor Katherine Kitt, who is also the founder of the UA Art Department. That year, C. Leonard Pfeiffer promised to give his art collection to UA, and from there, the collection...

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A message to this generation: Get bored

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BUZZZZZ. Alarm goes off. Check emails. Get dressed. Check Twitter. Eat breakfast. Scroll through Instagram. Technology disrupts and controls thinking. It has created a need to be connected, and scientists say this generation has a problem; there is a benefit to being bored. Whether it is to avoid awkward elevator rides, seek information about the news, or look at the latest posts from family and friends, social media is turning into an avid routine for many people. This is a generation that does not know how to be bored. According to experts, 7 in 10 Americans use social media and spend over seven hours on their smartphones. Every. Single. Day. Experts say not being bored is interrupting creativity, memories and productivity. Excessive social media use is detrimental to not only our relationships, but our physical and mental health. Sitting...

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Why late Edith Head’s doppelgänger will never leave Tucson

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Each Thanksgiving Day, one of Arizona’s “48 Most Intriguing Women” becomes a clown. But when it comes to her career, the 5-foot Tucsonan is anything but clownish. Susan Claassen’s energy, style and taste makes her an all-around class act. She not only runs Tucson’s Invisible Theatre, but she acts, writes and directs. “She’s not afraid of big projects,” said Molly McKasson, Claassen’s lifelong friend. “She’s willing and able to take on all of the work.” Claassen’s surreal physical resemblance to late Hollywood designer Edith Head changed her acting career forever. Years ago, she did a double take while watching a television biography of Head and knew there was a story to be told. In 2002, her one-woman show A Conversation With Edith Head was born and has been running ever since — earning her an Ovation Nomination, the Los...

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Bright flames cause rude awakening for city of Bisbee

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The City of Bisbee experienced a rude awakening on the morning of Oct. 11 as the town’s City Hall became incinerated in flames, but the historical documents within should be preservable, authorities said. Bisbee Police Chief Albert Echave confirmed that no historical or major project information was damaged in the fire.  “We were actually able to get into the vault and it does look like a lot of that stuff is still intact, might be a little wet, so there’s going to be some process that we will go through to preserve that stuff but it was not destroyed in the fire,” Echave said. The fire started around 1 a.m., with  Bisbee Fire Department being the first to arrive, and was later assisted by firefighters from other departments. Douglas, Palominas, Fry, San Jose, Whetstone, Sunnyside Fire departments helped exterminate...

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Unprotected sex? Think again

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Syphilis rates continue to rise throughout the country and in Arizona. Experts say lack of education, medical tools and now the progression of dating apps—the old-fashioned “Netflix and Chill”— have shown a positive correlation in increasing syphilis numbers. Since 2012, numbers have increased by 327 percent in Arizona compared to the number of people infected in 2016. During these years, the state recorded the third highest syphilis rates, according to federal data. However, Arizona is not the only one affected by these STD outbreaks. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016 had the highest number of new syphilis cases reported throughout all of America. Arizona trends mirror national cases. Numbers recorded in Arizona from January through August have increased 22 people in 2017 from the prior year for primary and secondary syphilis cases. The current total number...

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