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Coworking offers alternative office style

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At one point the concept of Fortune 500 companies and startup businesses sharing the same work space would have seemed impractical, but the coworking concept as done just that and Tucson is at the forefront.  Coworking is an alternative office style. At the most basic level it combines the freedom of independent work and collaboration by providing a shared workspace for individuals, established businesses and anything in between.  This shift in the workplace has quickly spread around the nation, and in 2014 the fad came to Tucson with the opening of Connect Coworking.   “We like the ‘feel’ at Connect, it’s fun and friendly, while also providing a professional workspace,” said Frank Bohac, a Connect member and president of Bohac Consulting Services Inc.  When thinking of a traditional office space, most people imagine one business and its employees. Connect Coworking breaks this normality by housing over 88 diverse enterprises under one roof.  “As soon as you walk into...

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Tattoos more prevalent among younger Americans

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Tattoos used to be a sign of risk-taking behavior in adolescents according to a survey done by The American Academy of Pediatrics in 2002, but today, this trend is more mainstream than ever and the view on tattoos has completely shifted. Today’s millennials were most likely told if they have tattoos, they will be less likely to be hired for a job. A study by The Harris Poll in 2016 determined 47 percent of millennials and 36 percent of Gen Xers have at least one tattoo. With this analysis it’s easy to understand why tattoo regulations, such as forbidding tattoos be shown in the work place, have been loosened in recent years. The Annual Tucson Tattoo Expo, in its ninth year, welcomed more guests this year than any previous years. The expo is a three-day event consisting of a fashion show,...

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Arizona’s very own candy company

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If you’re looking to fill your sweet tooth in Arizona, there is a home-grown place for you. Located in Glendale, Arizona, Cerreta’s Candy Company has been serving some of the best candies and chocolates in Arizona for more than 40 years. Jim Cerreta Sr., who learned the tricks of the trade from his father-in-law who also owned and operated a candy factory in Canton, Ohio, founded the company in 1968. So as not to move in on his father-in-law’s territory, Jim Sr. moved with his wife and eight children to Glendale where they set up shop and immediately began dishing out deliciousness to all of Arizona. All eight of Jim Sr.’s children have worked in the factory at a point in their life, and Jim Jr. and Joe still do. Cerreta’s does about $3 million of total sales every year,...

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Legislative Roundup

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PHOENIX – This past week at the Arizona Legislature was the final week committees met to hear and discuss bills, which fueled long hearings and late nights. As of March 20, there were 103 House bills and 79 Aenate bills awaiting hearings – and as of the end of the day on March 23, they were all heard. When does the session end? Officially, the end of April. But folks are still placing their bets. The sine-die pool is now open. Dive in by April 6 to predict when the Legislature wraps it up pic.twitter.com/SJ3oZ5wvy4 — Mary Jo Pitzl (@maryjpitzl) March 22, 2017 What’s Up, Gov? Gov. Doug Ducey got busy this week signing bills. On Monday, he signed House Bill 2268, introduced by Rep. Maria Syms, R-Phoenix, which requires all rape kits to be tested. The bill passed both the House and Senate unanimously. Ducey also...

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Sexism in Arizona politics might be here to stay

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PHOENIX – Arizona is doing well in regards to gender representation in the state Legislature, but it could take 30 years before the state reaches gender parity in its law-making body. Arizona is fourth in the nation for female representation in the state Legislature at 38.9 percent, behind Vermont, Nevada and Colorado, leaving 46 states with even fewer women in politics. Fifty percent of Arizonans are women, yet barely a third serve in elective office. And there’s more reason to have women in politics than simply representation of gender. “Women have a different leadership style than men do,” Sen. Kimberly Yee, R-Glendale, said. “And I think that is something we need to bring to the table.” Yee said, according to the Future Majority Project, a conservative group working toward gender and minority representation in U.S. politics, she is the highest-ranking female Republican...

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Arizona justice: Freeing the wrongly imprisoned

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In the fall of 2011, Khalil Rushdan walked out of prison a free man. Rushdan served 15 years of a 25-year sentence following his conviction for first-degree felony murder in 1997.  That year, Rushdan wasn’t alone when he became a free man. He was one of the 74 people exonerated in the U.S., according to the National Registry for Exonerations. His story, like so many others, is complex. In 1993, Rushdan worked as a middleman for drug dealers and sellers in Tucson. What started out as a regular deal quickly turned to violence. Rushdan had left the buyers and seller alone for the transaction and when he returned, one of the buyers had shot and killed the seller. “I come back to the house to lock up and make sure that nothing was left behind, to clean up,” said Rushdan. “And, I see them...

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Refugees get help planting new roots in Arizona

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    Somalian refugee Suleiman Arive carefully moves his foot farther up the tree branch to knock another grapefruit the size of a small basketball down to Bhutanese refugee Jasoda. She catches it, bringing a wide smile across her face. Arive laughed and politely asked me to retrieve his phone from his bag to Snapchat their teamwork as he reached for another unwanted grapefruit from a tree in a Tucson backyard. Arive and Jasoda are volunteering with a creative refugee network that gives those fleeing their conflict-stricken homes in Africa, Asia and the Middle East the opportunity to gain skills to better integrate them into their new home in Southern Arizona — all while saving them a trip to the grocery store by providing them with fruit and vegetables at no cost. Iskashitaa Refugee Network allows displaced people from over 30...

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Obesity continues to drop in Pima County

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Obesity continues to be a statewide problem in Arizona. In Pima County, 26.6 percent of adults are overweight or obese and high school students are more at risk of being obese because they are not getting enough physical activity and fruits and vegetables, according to the Centers for Disease Control division of community health reports. Certain ethnic groups tend to be significantly higher in the Pima County area due to not enough access to physical activity and healthy grocery stores. According to the CDC, 33.1 percent of Hispanics are obese. The national average is 30.6 percent. Obesity rates in Pima County are fairly high because of food insecurity among children and adults as well as low-income, elderly and children with limited access to a grocery store, according to Javier Herrera, community engagement program manager for the Pima County Board of Health....

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Adderall kickback proves more dangerous than users think

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Lilly has a morning routine that is a little different than many college students. She wakes up. She eats breakfast. But with her breakfast, she takes a small pill that helps her feel more focused and relaxed as she starts her day. Vyvanse, Lilly’s morning prescription drug choice, is used to stimulate the central nervous system and affect the chemicals in the brain often used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in which the patient finds it extremely difficult to concentrate. Although Vyvanse helps Lilly stay focused, it only does so for a short time. That’s why around 3 p.m. Lilly switches to another drug, one that usually keeps her alert, focused and motivated until she goes to bed and a drug that 1 in 5 college students regularly abuse, according to a survey released by the Partnership for Drug-Free...

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Eliminating NEA could be detrimental to Arizona communities

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            For small towns like Douglas, grants for the arts can be deeply influential. With the election of a new mayor in 2016, Douglas is looking at a future that thrives on arts and culture, and is using National Endowment for the Arts funding to bring back life to this troubled border town in Arizona’s southeast corner. Mayor Robert Uribe and his wife, Jenea Sanchez, have been working diligently to find a way to rebuild Douglas as a historic city that can be recognized as a cultural center and supporter of the arts. “For our state arts organization to come into our local community and contribute funds towards our arts refinement, it very much legitimizes the work that we have started on, and we are so grateful for that,” Sanchez said.   The Trump administration plans to eliminate...

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