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News for Southeastern Arizona, provided by the University of Arizona School of Journalism

Not much revenue expected from alcohol sales at UA basketball

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Beer and wine are coming to Arizona basketball games. Tucson City Council voted Tuesday in favor of the University of Arizona selling beer and wine at college basketball games. At first glance, it seems like this is just another way for the university to make a bunch of cash. But experts say that there is actually not as much money to be made in alcohol sales as one might think. Adding alcohol to college sporting events has been a trend in recent years, mainly with college football games, but recently some basketball schools have started doing it as well, Philadelphia Inquirer sports reporter Frank Fitzpatrick told ASN. “There was no NCAA regulation banning it. It was just a de facto prohibition,” said Fitzpatrick, who has written about the issue often for the Philadelphia Inquirer.   Fitzpatrick said selling alcohol at...

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The Khalil Tate era is just beginning

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As just a 19-year-old sophomore, Inglewood, California, native Khalil Tate took the nation by storm. After spending the first three games of the season backing up then Arizona starting quarterback Brandon Dawkins, Tate exploded onto the scene. During his breakout season, Tate broke the NCAA rushing record for yards in a single game by a quarterback (327 yards), finished third in the nation in rush yards per game (155.3 yards), and led in rushing yards per attempt (11.44 yards). Proud, shocked, and impressed with his own achievements? Not so fast. “I haven’t even showed the world half of what I’m capable of,” said Tate during an interview with ASN. Khalil Tate, or “Little Tate” as he was known at the local parks where he first fell in love with football in Inglewood, hasn’t had the easiest journey to stardom...

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How to build a 27-foot mirror under a football stadium

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Beneath the east bleachers of  Arizona Stadium, the most delicate and perfected mirror-making process takes place. The University of Arizona’s Richard F. Caris Mirror Laboratory is famous for building mirrors for some of the world’s most powerful telescopes. Engineers at the mirror lab are working on mirrors for the Giant Magellan Telescope; each mirror is about 27-feet in diameter.Upon completion, the GMT will be the largest telescope in the world and will revolutionize the way astronomers study the universe. “It will allow astronomers to study earth-like planets around other stars,” said Thomas Fleming, an astronomer and senior lecturer at the University of Arizona. “Also, the further away you can see in space, the further back in time you’re looking.” Five of the seven GMT mirrors are at some point in this engineering process. But how are these massive mirrors made?...

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University of Arizona climate researchers worried about funding cuts for future projects

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One month ago, a forest fire in California burned over 200,000 acres, destroyed 2,800 homes and killed 41 people. Two months ago, Hurricane Maria ripped through Puerto Rico and left millions of people without electricity, fresh water or ways to communicate. This year, Arizona and 38 other states, experienced above-average temperatures for the first 10 months of the year. Across the globe, climate change research is being used to prepare for natural-disaster response, sustainability and the future. But the research that helps prepare, save lives and preserve the economy is under attack. The Trump administration has promised to eliminate or greatly reduce all climate change research funding in the next four years. “At this point, we haven’t seen a real budget from this administration. So we don’t know yet what they’re going to do,” said Daniel Ferguson, director of...

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A statue’s hidden story

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A story that began over 30 years ago in Tucson comes back to life today through the personification of a statue. Marge Pellegrino and Marianna Neil wrote “The Sculpture Speaks: A Story of Survival” after they discovered a statue in the Southside Presbyterian Church in Tucson. Their story follows events in the 1980s involving the persecution of refugees in the United States. Only their story stemmed from a bronze statue. Artist John Howser created the statue and used refugee Juana as his model. During this time, the government handed down indictments that went after sanctuaries. Because of this, Carmen Duarte of the Arizona Daily Star, shared Juana’s story of her journey from Mexico City to Tucson. This caught the eye of government officials, who began trying to track her down. Juana, at this time, was posing for Howser’s sculpture....

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Guest farm workers do not always understand the rules

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With almost no one in the U.S. willing to work harvest jobs, farms have imported workers via temporary visas, a program widely criticized for the extensive bureaucratic requirements including housing workers. This winter Yuma area farms are expected to produce around 90 percent of the nation’s lettuce and green crops, meaning these farms need to find enough labor to harvest their crops. This year, 77 Arizona worksites requested temporary workers, of those four were denied. A total of 5,676 imported workers have so far worked or will work in Arizona this year. Arizona had six housing violations filed since the beginning of 2016, two of which were the same farm. The housing inspections are conducted by the Arizona Department of Economic Security. G farms was listed among the violators for “job order specification” and “misrepresented terms and conditions of...

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Good Enough Mine back in business

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The recent sale of the Good Enough Mine Tour restores a popular tourist site in Tombstone. The tunnels in the mine go more than 700 feet deep. Andre and Shirley DeJournett purchased the mine in 2003 (Tombstone Consolidated Mines Incorporated)  and recently sold the land for about $299,000. After being on the market since June, the deed was signed over to the new owners late November. A couple from Alabama bought the property. Paul Rahricht, realtor for Tombstone Real Estate, said this is the first purchase for the couple, Patricia and Richard Jones in the town of Tombstone. The couple received a warm welcoming from fellow town members on the Old Tombstone Gazette Facebook page. The Joneses are from Alabama and recently stumbled upon the Good Enough Mine Tour during a belated honeymoon and overheard the mine was out...

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The effects of plastic bags in our environment

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The City of Bisbee is economically fueled by tourism, and the problems caused by plastic bags makes it harder for tourists to enjoy. Plastic bags are made of an ethylene byproduct like natural gas and petroleum, that damages ecosystems in the ocean and on land killing numerous animals. “They get caught in waterways and block the flow of rainwater runoff, they disintegrate into little tiny pieces and animals get them caught in their stomach,” said Jill Bernstein, executive director of Keep Arizona Beautiful.  “There’s just about a 100,000 different ways plastic bags are damaging the environment.” As plastic bags are vastly distributed in retail and grocery stores, they continue to cause large environmental problems that destroy marine and land habitats. In the beginning, as an effort to eliminate the problem, citizens of Bisbee volunteered to clean up the mess,...

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Bisbee Festival of Lights glows another year

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From the ashes of a fire at City Hall, the City of Bisbee comes together as a community to kick off the holiday season, even if it’s with fewer twinkling lights. The Bisbee Festival of Lights, now in its 29th year, brought its annual holiday spirit to the City of Bisbee on Nov. 24, despite the challenge of losing nearly all the decorations the city has gathered over the years. “We had a lot of stuff that is now gone,” said Lorena Valdez, an administrative assistant for the City of Bisbee Public Works department and one of the event organizers for the Festival of lights. Valdez said when she took the role of organizing the event six years ago, she “started with very little, but did whatever [she] could” with the decorations the city had at the time. Over...

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Green card holders fret about citizenship

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Nervous green card holders are seeking citizenship in greater numbers because of concerns that the Trump Administration’s new immigration policies could send them out of the country. From July 2016 to September 2016, the number of I-485 forms (the application for a green card) received at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) was 158,442, according to data released by USCIS. From October 2016 to December 2016, that number increased by about 17.5 percent to 186,036. William DeSantiago, managing attorney of the immigration program at the Catholic Charities Community Services of Phoenix, said that ever since the election there have been more consultations at his organization and applications for citizenship because people are concerned about the laws of their legal residency. USCIS received 239,628 N-400 forms (application for naturalization) from October 2016 to December 2016 and that number increased about 21...

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