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Homeopathic remedies in the Hispanic community.

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In the Hispanic community, homeopathic remedies have been passed down through generations. Whether it’s at the U.S-Mexico border or in South Tucson, visiting a folk healer or an herbalist can be commonplace in the Hispanic culture. A homeopathic remedy is an alternative medicine practice that uses natural remedies such as plants, animals and minerals. In many cases, remedies are similar to what pharmaceutical companies use. Patrisia Gonzales, University of Arizona professor in Mexican American Studies, focuses on indigenous remedies in the Hispanic community. Also an herbalist, Gonzales has found that using plant-based materials in home remedies have helped families thrive throughout the years. “There is this incredible ecosystems throughout what we call today Mexico and throughout the Southwest,” she said. “There are thousands of plants that people can use for home remedies. When the traditional herbs were outlawed, people started to...

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Sanctuary movement: perception or power?

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Late in 2014, Francisco Perez Cordova left his Tucson office-turned-bedroom at St. Francis in the Foothills United Methodist Church after 94 days in sanctuary. A year later, Rosa Robles left her sanctuary at Southside Presbyterian Church in Tucson after 461 days. Cordova had been detained when his brother-in-law reported a crime, while Robles had been taken in for a minor traffic infraction. Both were undocumented, both had called the United States home for decades and both had children they were separated from while in sanctuary. “This is his home and for some reason we don’t want to recognize that,” said Rev. Jim Wiltbank, pastor at St. Francis in the Foothills. Sanctuary cases like these occur throughout the U.S. — and more could arise after President Trump’s executive order targeting undocumented residents. His executive order denies federal funding to sanctuary cities, or cities that choose...

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Nogales nightlife thrives behind the fence

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Our taxi driver was supposed to be taking us a few blocks down the road for dinner. But we’d been in the cab, weaving around other cars, aggressively accelerating then quickly breaking for at least 10 minutes. “Almost there!” He would assure us over the blaring Spanish rap CD in the car stereo. The three of us were packed in like sardines, tightly into the back seat, exchanging frantic glances about the length of our ride. I invited the two nervous girls next to me to Nogales, Sonora, for a weekend getaway. We were curious about the culture and people, the entire lifestyle, beyond the border checkpoint. I didn’t know what to expect, but we definitely weren’t prepared to be surprised. Panic hadn’t truly settled in until the cab began to scoot along the on-ramp to a desolate two-lane...

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Homeless youth invisible in Southern Arizona

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They are the hidden ones living under a different roof each week. By no fault of their own, they are outcasts without a home. They are teens missing football games and school dances to work extra shifts to pay for another meal. They are poor and battling the world alone. “Homeless youth, is one of those things that sort of perplexes people,” said Kristyn Conner, director of development at Youth On Their Own, a dropout prevention program in Tucson. “It is out of sight and out of mind. With adult homelessness, you can see it. But with homeless youth, it is different because they aren’t actually living on the streets as much as their adult counterparts.” In its most recent report, the state Department of Education reported 28,391 enrolled homeless children and youth in grades pre-kindergarten through 12th grade....

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Marigolds Bridge the Worlds of the Living and Dead

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By Emily Ellis Luis Coronado needed just one thing to complete his altar for el Día de los Muertos. Something that represents ancient Aztec legends. Something that brightens altars in homes throughout Latin America and the United States every autumn.  Something used around the world to lure the souls of the dead back to earth. Luckily, he found what he was looking for on sale at Costco. “You can see why they’re called las flores de los muertos,” says Coronado, a Mexican historian at the University of Arizona.  He hefts a large pot of bobbing golden flowers onto a corner of the altar he has built in the UA Latin American Studies Department. A sickly-sweet smell wafts over the grinning sugar skulls and black-and-white photographs. “Spirits come from a dark place,” he says. “To attract them to the material world, you...

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Lalo Guerrero: Tesoro Nacional del Folklor

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Escrito por Hailey Freeman Traducido por Lizeth D. Castellanos Mientras que miembros del equipo y voluntarios acarrean bocinas, cables y amplificadores desde el escenario improvisado en el festival folclórico Tucson Meet Yourself, el guitarrista George Landa convive con los tantos fans que esperan en línea para comprar el disco de su banda. Vestido con una boina y una camisa de boliche con un estampado de llamas, Landa acepta con gratitud los cumplidos de sus fans. Él y sus compañeros de banda Los Nawdy Dawgs acaban de terminar un tributo de una hora honrando la musicalidad de Eduardo “Lalo” Guerrero, nativo de Tucson, también conocido como el Padre de la Música Chicana.            Lalo es considerado Tesoro Nacional del Folklor (National Folk Treasure) por el Instituto Smithsoniano (Smithsonian Institution). Fue pionero de numerosas técnicas y estilos musicales, convirtiéndose en el...

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Aliados para el bienestar

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Por Christina Duran Traducido Hiriana N. Gallegos En una calurosa mañana de sábado, varias personas se juntan alrededor de una camioneta blanca en frente de la organización  House of Neighborly Services. Lorenzo González se para con la espalda hacia su camioneta con el logo del Sur de Tucson repartiendo cajas de pintura de aerosol, bolsas de plástico llenas de esponjas, trapos, papel de lija y baldes hasta el tope de agua. Brevemente le da instrucciones al público. “¡Recuerden no pinten la lechada!”, grita el Sr. González. “Voy a pasar por cada uno de los marcos si alguien necesita algo, ¡Gracias!” Grupos de tres a cuatro personas pintaban los marcos de los murales icónicos del Sur de Tucson creados por Las Artes, un programa de educación de artes para los estudiantes que no terminaron la preparatoria. Este evento que se...

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Redefiniendo Chicano Hip-Hop

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Por Stephen H. Crane III Traducido por Hiriana N. Gallegos La pequeña sala de narguile estaba llena de espectadores que esperaban presenciar el primer concierto de un artista joven.            Pero la memoria USB del artista no funcionó. No tenía la música de fondo.            “Lo más absurdo es que canté a capela”, compartió el cantante. “Me subí al escenario y le di con todo. La gente se alocó”.            Spit Hell Manuel, alias Manuel Andrade, tal vez tuvo un comienzo escabroso como artista, pero hoy en día el chicano apasionado y simpático está desempeñando su carrera en hip-hop. Tiene cuatro discos disponibles y ha creado más de 40 canciones. Andrade creció y actualmente vive en Avondale, Arizona, el cual él describe como algo difícil. “Me dijeron que ser mexicano en rap no esta de onda, así que aquí...

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Nogalenses create an oasis in a food desert

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By CHRISTINA DURAN Arizona Sonora News (Christina Duran is a reporter for El Independiente) Down Morley Avenue, one side of the street is lined with storefronts selling girls’ party clothes and bright plastic toys. On the other side, tents and tables occupy what’s usually a vacant parking lot. Each table is laden with an assortment of produce and homemade treats, from kale and yellow butternut squash, to pomegranates, empanadas, and different cheeses. A big metal pot between the crates of food lure Nogalenses with the rich scent of carne con chile tamales. Friday afternoons, near the border that separates Nogales and Sonora, people gather to listen to Latino hits and to enjoy the food at the Nogales Mercado. In 2012 the Mariposa Community Health Center (MCHC) and Nogales Community Development (NCD) partnered to found the Nogales Mercado. Their aim...

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‘Spit Hell Manuel’ on stage with Chicano rap

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By STEPHEN H. CRANE Arizona Sonora News (Stephen H. Crane III is a reporter with El Independiente) The small, crowded hookah lounge was filled with an audience awaiting a young artist’s first performance. But the performer’s flash drive failed. He had no music to back him up. “The crazy thing was that I performed acapella,” he said. “I went up there and ripped the stage. People were going crazy.” Spit Hell Manuel, AKA Manuel Andrade, may have had a rocky start as a performer, but today Andrade is making a career for himself in hip-hop. He has four albums available, and has created well over 40 songs. He grew up and currently lives in Avondale, Arizona, which he describes as pretty rough. “‘They told me, being Mexican in rap ain’t cool, so I’m here to kick doors down and...

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