Pages Navigation Menu

News for Southeastern Arizona, provided by the University of Arizona School of Journalism

Green card holders fret about citizenship

By | 0 comments

Nervous green card holders are seeking citizenship in greater numbers because of concerns that the Trump Administration’s new immigration policies could send them out of the country. From July 2016 to September 2016, the number of I-485 forms (the application for a green card) received at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) was 158,442, according to data released by USCIS. From October 2016 to December 2016, that number increased by about 17.5 percent to 186,036. William DeSantiago, managing attorney of the immigration program at the Catholic Charities Community Services of Phoenix, said that ever since the election there have been more consultations at his organization and applications for citizenship because people are concerned about the laws of their legal residency. USCIS received 239,628 N-400 forms (application for naturalization) from October 2016 to December 2016 and that number increased about 21...

Read More

Chinese in Arizona

By | 0 comments

Traveling by train in Yuma with a box of bones in his hands, G.W. Chapman did what many believed to be sacrilegious. He dumped a huge box filled with dead Chinese immigrants’ bones into the Colorado River. It was a warm day in 1882, and “Old Chap,” Tombstone’s express messenger and mail clerk, had promised their families that he would fulfill the cultural tradition of returning the bones to their homeland. His violation of the cultural tradition was one of many incidents across Arizona in which the Chinese were treated as second-class citizens. The Chinese first came to the United States in large numbers in the 19th century and helped modernize America by building railroads. Their customs and lifestyle unsettled whites, who used the power of legislation and general hate to discriminate against the Chinese. On the day, Chapman...

Read More

Blacks, Latinos face heftier prison time

By | 0 comments

Nationwide, for every one white person imprisoned, roughly five black people are, according to the Sentencing Project. In Arizona, those ratios are similar for African Americans, with Hispanics being imprisoned roughly twice as much as whites. Yet, the U.S. Census Bureau’s data show that black people only take up about 5 percent of the total population of the state and Hispanic or Latino people make up about 31 percent. In a report by the American Civil Liberties Union, “Black and Latino offenders sentenced in state and federal courts face significantly greater odds of incarceration than similarly situated white offenders.” Additionally, in some jurisdictions, they might “receive longer sentences than their white counterparts.” Ashley Nellis, a senior research analyst of the Sentencing Project, said – in accordance with data for Arizona – the white imprisonment rate per 100,000 people in...

Read More

Women’s pay shortchanged

By | 0 comments

Eighteen cents. That is the difference between a woman and a man working in Arizona. According to data by the Institute of Women’s Policy Research’s (IWPR) project Status of Women in the States, Arizona ranks 17 out of 51, which includes the 50 states and D.C. For every dollar a man earns in Arizona, a woman earns 82 cents. This means that the wage gap is narrower in Arizona than most states, but it might not be because the situation is better here. Julie Anderson, a senior research associate who manages the Status of Women in the States project in D.C., said that in some states the wage gap might appear smaller due to factors like men not particularly having higher earnings so it just seems like the wage gap is narrower. While the gap continues to narrow, if...

Read More