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La orden de inmigración de Trump talvez no cuente con el apoyo de las fuerzas policiales de Arizona

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  PHOENIX – Las agencias policiales de Arizona, en su mayoría, dicen que no participarán en extensas redadas de inmigración que tienen como objetivo a los inmigrantes indocumentados que han residido en los EE.UU. por un largo tiempo, (indocumentados de largo plazo), sin importar que diga la nueva orden executiva del presidente Trump. Los departamentos de policía de Phoenix, Tucson y Nogales, y los sheriffs del condado de Yuma, Santa Cruz y Maricopa, mencionan que los agentes de policía no tendrán como objetivo a los inmigrantes indocumentados de largo plazo, que no han cometido delitos graves violentos. El Sheriff del condado Cochise, Mark Dannels, dijo que sus agentes no tendrán como objetivo a personas simplemente por ser indocumentados de largo plazo, pero si estos cometen un delito, los agentes los entregarán a las autoridades de inmigración. Una versión anterior...

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Sharing music through generations

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Ruben Moreno has been playing mariachi music since the spring of 1974. The genre fell into his lap after a knee injury playing football at the University of Arizona sent him to the hospital. While recovering the Tucson native ran into his former Little League coach whose son was looking for a trumpet player to accompany his mariachi band at Disney World that summer. Today you can find Moreno every Sunday at Playground Bar & Lounge on Congress St. from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. playing with his band, Mariachi Luz de Luna. As a young boy, Moreno was drawn to the trumpet. This love developed from his DNA and the new sound that came from the Herb Alpert Tijuana Brass Band. “Remember those nursery rhymes you loved as a child? Compare those simple melodies to what you like now… and...

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Major league soccer teams providing local economic boost to state, for now

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When major league baseball spring training left Tucson in 2010, it left questions for how the town would fill the void. Now, Major League Soccer’s sixth year training here in Tucson that is bringing in the money. FC Tucson, an American semi-professional soccer team, is stationed out of Kino Sports Complex and is hosting two large tournaments for the major league teams. 2017 Desert Friendlies ended the beginning of February while the 2017 Desert Diamond Cup starts Feb. 18 at Kino North Stadium and six teams will participate in this competitive tournament. MLS Cup Champions the Seattle Sounders will be here this year and Dan Gibson, director of communications for Visit Tucson, believes such a high-caliber team will bring in fans. “We have both the teams from New York this year and New York is a big market for...

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Homeopathic remedies in the Hispanic community.

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In the Hispanic community, homeopathic remedies have been passed down through generations. Whether it’s at the U.S-Mexico border or in South Tucson, visiting a folk healer or an herbalist can be commonplace in the Hispanic culture. A homeopathic remedy is an alternative medicine practice that uses natural remedies such as plants, animals and minerals. In many cases, remedies are similar to what pharmaceutical companies use. Patrisia Gonzales, University of Arizona professor in Mexican American Studies, focuses on indigenous remedies in the Hispanic community. Also an herbalist, Gonzales has found that using plant-based materials in home remedies have helped families thrive throughout the years. “There is this incredible ecosystems throughout what we call today Mexico and throughout the Southwest,” she said. “There are thousands of plants that people can use for home remedies. When the traditional herbs were outlawed, people started to...

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Crumbling athletic facilities set back UA

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When Greg Byrne became University of Arizona’s athletic director in May of 2010, he was determined to bandage UA’s aging sports facilities. Letting them slowly crumble and not meet the standards of the 21st century was not a choice. Getting the movement going would not be easy. After all, UA’s annual budget was $84 million. Compare that to the University of Alabama’s annual budget of $186 million. A number of renovations have been made to the 45-year-old McKale Center and to the almost century year old Arizona Stadium to keep up with the Stanfords and UCLAs. The baseball team left campus for Hi Corbett Field in 2012 for a much more updated, modern facility. The patches Byrne bandaged up though, will not be enough going forward. It’s not just main facilities requiring serious attention now. The LaNelle Robson Tennis...

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Arizona restaurants dish it out on national TV

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American food meets reality television in Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, hosted by Guy Fieri, which features restaurants around the country because of their unique and and intriguing dishes. Food Network and Cooking Channel Public Relations Manager Julie Chudow said the producers of the show conduct ongoing research on cities they plan to visit. “They research restaurants that come through recommendation and word of mouth to find the gems that local residents visit and talk about,” Chudow said. Through the Triple D team’s endeavors around Arizona, restaurants who deserve the elite recognition of being featured on national television had the opportunity to showcase their quirky ambiances and recipes. Enjoy the beer can chicken, s’mores cheesecake and mac & cheese muffins that blew Guy away at The Duce, but do not feel bad, you can hit the gym attached to...

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Holistic medicine, what you need to know

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  October 2016. Eduardo “Eddie” Estrada gently sips a beer and while closing his eyes. He takes a French fry and looks at his hand as he begins to remember. It’s September 2012. Estrada returns to the United States after a serving his country as a Hospital Man Third Class in Afghanistan. This is where it all began; the nightmares, the stress, the anger. “It started gradually,” said Estrada, “ When I got out of the military, I thought I was fine and didn’t have any transition problems but I came from a place that was very strict and everyone respected you.” Estrada deals with a mental illness, as do other 57 million Americans, a disease that affects the individual and the people surrounding them. Most patients are prescribed medications, but new strategies like yoga, meditation, dance and art...

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Arizonans ask for regulation rollbacks on taxes, water-use, hot dogs

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PHOENIX – Gov. Doug Ducey’s hotline for red tape tips is gaining more complaints than suggestions. Ducey promised to eliminate 500 regulations “that are standing in the way of job growth” by the end of the year, so he took his challenge to the people – or rather, the Internet. The governor set up Red Tape, an online service to crowd source recommendations from Arizona citizens on which regulations should be eliminated. In the first weeks of the program, the most commonly complained about issues were taxes and different water-use regulations, particularly how they effect the rural areas of the state. This doesn’t represent the wants of the state as a whole, though: only a couple dozen Arizonans recommended anything at all. Taxes, always the hot button topic in Arizona politics, were hot on the regulation rollback site. Why? “Taxation is theft,” the entirety of...

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Legislative Roundup: Cell phones and tampon tax

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PHOENIX – On Tuesday, Valentine’s Day, the capitol was full of gratuitous shows of love: singing on the House floor,  heart-shaped balloons on the rose garden. Nothing was too cheesy. But whether state minimum wage workers will feel the love became the question. On Monday, the state Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction over a lawsuit to block Proposition 206, the $10 minimum wage hike that was voter-approved during the last election. The court will hear oral arguments on March 9, but until then, there are plenty of stories to bring you up to date on the conflict. To wrap the work week up, on Thursday the governor rode into his office with style. That is to say, he sat in the passenger side of a race car and fishtailed in front of the capitol. What a way to end a week. I wish @dougducey...

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Men slow to accept HPV treatment

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Some men do not even know they are killers. There are many misconceptions that say the human papillomavirus (HPV) only affects women, but men are certainly not in the clear. About one in four people in the United States are currently infected with some form of HPV, which is the most common sexually transmitted disease today. Forty-five percent of men and women are infected with HPV in the U.S., according to Dr. Janice Han, a doctor in the division of gynecologic oncology at Womack Army Medical Center, in Fort Bragg, N.C. HPV vaccination rates are higher in women than they are in men. In 2006, women were recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to get the Gardasil shot to prevent HPV-related cancers. Men, however, were not introduced to the vaccine until 2011, according to Dr. Elissa...

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The power and infamy of Dusty Escapule

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Many love him, many hate him and the ones who dislike Tombstone Mayor Dustin Escapule don’t talk about him because they fear him. The man known as Dusty has made the “town too tough to die” his town. His strong local support and service over five terms in 10 years delivers the last name Escapule as immense authority in Tombstone. He’s a fourth-generation native. His great grandfather settled in Tombstone in 1877, two years before the town was established. Because of similar facial features, his grandfather, John Henry Escapule, was often mistaken as Doc Holliday from the O.K. Corral gunfight. The Escapule roots are deep in Tombstone, but Dusty is a different breed considering his political prowess. Escapule is a good ole’ country boy who looks out for his own. Occasionally he’ll be seen driving his truck around Allen Street sporting...

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Sanctuary movement: perception or power?

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Late in 2014, Francisco Perez Cordova left his Tucson office-turned-bedroom at St. Francis in the Foothills United Methodist Church after 94 days in sanctuary. A year later, Rosa Robles left her sanctuary at Southside Presbyterian Church in Tucson after 461 days. Cordova had been detained when his brother-in-law reported a crime, while Robles had been taken in for a minor traffic infraction. Both were undocumented, both had called the United States home for decades and both had children they were separated from while in sanctuary. “This is his home and for some reason we don’t want to recognize that,” said Rev. Jim Wiltbank, pastor at St. Francis in the Foothills. Sanctuary cases like these occur throughout the U.S. — and more could arise after President Trump’s executive order targeting undocumented residents. His executive order denies federal funding to sanctuary cities, or cities that choose...

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Arizona’s fashion industry not just for cowboys anymore

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As the birthplace of the squaw dress, Tucson was once a major player in the fashion industry. During the height of its reign, Tucson was considered a place of major style influence, one to even match the likes of New York City or Los Angeles. The squaw dress was a major staple in the wardrobes of many women and maintained its coveted top spot for 20 years. But, as the famous saying goes, all good things must come to an end, and as the squaw dress declined in popularity so did the influence that Arizona had on the fashion industry. For many years, the Grand Canyon State has tried to revive its influence on the industry, and with many ups and downs along the way it seems that there finally may be legitimate plans to make that hope a...

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El Jefe: Missing in action

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El Jefe, Tucson’s lone male jaguar, caught the attention of Arizonans while residing in a tree in Southeastern Arizona. For three years, pictures from trail cameras flooded conservationists’ computers and proved that El Jefe had created his home in the Santa Rita Mountains. It’s been a year since trail cameras caught footage of the wandering jaguar, and the news is not good. El Jefe is missing. It began in 2011 when hunting guide Donnie Fenn and his hunting dogs spotted and captured a picture of a jaguar while searching for mountain lions. Since then, conservationists and volunteers have been working to conserve El Jefe and his habitat in hopes of repopulating the species in the United States. A government-funded research project held by the University of Arizona placed trail cameras in remote locations in the mountains and accepted trained volunteers...

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Child poverty in Southern Arizona runs rampant

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Children in Southern Arizona are more likely to be living in poverty than anywhere else in the state. This discrepancy has far-reaching consequences beyond simply a bad childhood, and is the primary reason for Arizona having the sixth worst poverty rate in the country. This is despite the fact that statewide, the rate of poverty in most metro areas is declining. A 15-year longitudinal study published by Cornell University in late 2016 showed that children raised in poverty were susceptible to a series of psychological distresses, spurred by the stress and environment, ultimately bleeding over into their adult lives. Tucson’s poverty rate has leveled out at 25 percent over the past three years, posing potential long-term effects. The Cornell study, authored by Gary Evans, a professor in human ecology and in the departments of design and environmental analysis, found research...

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