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For these U.A. young women, it’s not their first rodeo

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By NATALIA V. NAVARRO Arizona Sonora News Tabytha Friend holds onto her hat in high winds while circling at the Wentz Point Arena in Marana, Arizons.(Photo by Rebecca Noble / Arizona Sonora News)Dust flies and cheers erupt over country music as a woman from the University of Arizona Rodeo Club enters the arena. In 18 seconds it’s over. The women in the UA Rodeo Club are trampling cowgirl stereotypes all year round in intense competition like the Wentz Point Arena Wednesday Night Jackpot Barrel Race early last month. “When a lot of people think about cowgirls, they think of, like daisy dukes and tied up plaid shirts and it’s nothing like that,” said Tabytha Friend, a biology major and a transfer from Cochise College. “We probably get just as dirty as the boys if not dirtier. We do everything...

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A relative of the desert haboob: The less predictable dust-channel

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By MIKAYLA MACE Arizona Sonora News [UPDATED] Everyone in Arizona knows what haboobs are: A towering wall of dust, sometimes a half-mile high and a hundred miles wide, caused by summer monsoons rolling in over Tucson and southeast Arizona, and slamming the dry, loose dirt into the air. This monster sweeps across the desert northward toward Phoenix. These large dust storms can be predicted, seen and avoided. The haboob’s lesser known cousin, the sudden dust-channel, is much smaller but more unpredictable and dangerous. The most dangerous dust-channels pop up quickly next to freeways and are borne out of the dry, loose dirt from devegetated land or fallow fields. On windy days, this dirt is easily blown in thick curtains across freeways, cutting visibility down to as low as five feet. In 2015, 47 crashes were caused blowing dust statewide....

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Cochise County economy lags as Fort Huachuca jobs plunge

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By DANYELLE KHMARA Arizona Sonora News A year ago, Adrianne Cooper opened Cooper’s Credit Repair Nerds out of her home in Hereford, a small town in rural Cochise County, less than a half-hour drive from the Mexican border. Within nine months, her business – helping people budget their finances and fix credit issues —  moved to a 200-square-foot office in Sierra Vista, the county’s largest town.  Now, she’s upgraded to a 400-square-foot storefront near a tax preparation company, a hair salon and a car dealership. “I believe more non-traditional businesses could grow in this town,” Cooper said, who thinks the local economy these days is a lot more than just big-box stores. “It’s about the small business.” Cooper’s success is a bit of good news in Cochise County, a hard place that has suffered more than its share of...

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In usually quiet Lake Havasu, the party gets hearty come Spring Break time

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BY LEAH MERRALL Arizona Sonora News On the western border of central Arizona sits Lake Havasu City, a relatively quiet town of around 50,000 beside the Colorado River that’s characterized by its large body of water — actually, a reservoir for the Colorado River’s flow — in the middle of the desert. It’s home to an actual London Bridge and to retirees from colder regions of the country and Canada during the winter months who enjoy the laid-back desert atmosphere. Laid-back till the spring, that is, when this small community turns into one of the country’s hottest and wildest Spring Break destinations during March. Every March, thousands of college students roll into town for a constant party, bringing loud music and intense drinking. Hotels suddenly get booked for mid-week and the lake becomes populated with boats that house often drunk students who...

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Future of S. Arizona desert farming and development floats on water

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By ELIZABETH EATON Arizona Sonora News Service GREEN VALLEY — Row after row of pecan trees stretches into the distance, their dark green reaching up to mix with the blue of the sky, like color blots on a painter’s easel. The smell is undeniably earthy. The trees lean in toward each other, creating a shaded pathway between the rows. It’s cool and inviting – and hard to believe that this is Southern Arizona. Rich Walden, farm manager of the Green Valley Pecan Company and grandson of the founder, drives down the rows in his pickup. He points out how, over the years, he and his family have implemented different techniques to conserve water. Only the pecan trees on the older parts of the farm rely on flood irrigation to provide vital water to their thirsty roots. About a quarter of...

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Santa Rita Park: A haven for some, a hazard or others

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By EMILY ELLIS Arizona Sonora News (Emily Ellis is a reporter for El Independiente)   Rain begins to fall over Santa Rita Park as Gary Martinez, 58, limps over to where he has spread his freshly washed clothes on the scrubby grass. His wife, 63, pushes a laden shopping cart toward the shelter of the bleachers by the baseball field. A blue sleeping bag tumbles from the cart. She bends to pick it up, wincing. Martinez, arms full of damp laundry, shouts at her to leave it. “My lady has a bad back,” he explains later. “I gotta watch out for her, make sure she doesn’t hurt herself.”   Ever since they failed to pay the rent for their south side apartment five years ago, the Martinezes, both of whom are disabled, spend their days at Santa Rita. The expansive...

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In Tombstone, memories of a famed clown who was sad, not ‘creepy’

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  By KYLE KOCHEVAR Arizona Sonora News We’ve had a lot of “creepy clown” news since the end of summer. In a craze spreading through the country, pranksters and hooligans wearing leering white-face clown costumes were popping out of the woods to scare school children and created a wave of social-media hysteria that wasn’t the least bit funny — including in southern Arizona. But there was news of another kind of clown in this region late last month. In Tombstone, November 29 marked the 10th anniversary of the death of one of the town’s most famous residents: Emmett Kelly Jr., who had retired there.  While Tombstone is best known for the 1883 shootout at the O.K. Corral, Emmett Kelly Jr. was the opposite of what made Tombstone famous. He was a clown –and for a time he was the most...

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The Space Race of the past launched astronomy’s future in Tucson

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By MIKAYLA MACE Arizona Sonora News On July 20, 1969, 600 million people watched Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon and say, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Little did NASA scientists realize at the time, but their historical feat had just inspired a new generation of scientists. Those children of the space race are today’s established researchers and professors, and many of them are here at the University of Arizona. On the other hand, today’s graduate students, the next batch of space scientists, have never experienced the national enthusiasm of the space program first-hand. Instead, they’ve seen the Shuttle program canceled, funding cuts to NASA, and private companies take over cargo deliveries to the International Space Station. Ultimately, their motivations for becoming astronomers, and their plans for the future of astronomy, differ...

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An elegy in Mayan echoes for Guatamalan migrants in Arizona

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El Independiente reporter Emily Ellis began investigating this story over the summer while studying Mayan K’iche in Nahuala, Guatemala. She continued interviewing Mayan migrants in Tucson after returning to Arizona.  BY EMILY ELLIS Arizona Sonora News  Every Sunday the residents of Nahuala, Guatemala, walk quietly through the pale dawn mist to the white church that stands in the center of their small town. The women go to the pews on the right. Their heads are draped with colorful hand-woven shawls. Some have yawning babies strapped to their backs by sturdy cloth bands. The men go to the left, where the pews are far more empty. The priest always begins the service the same way. He reads a list of names in Mayan K’iche – a language that, while spoken only in a small section of a country the size...

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Snowbirds back in Southern Arizona, and the wild outdoors beckon

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By AMBER WHITE Arizona Sonora News It’s the start of the winter holiday season, and the snowbirds are on their way back to Arizona in their annual migration. Their arrival changes the demographic scene and in some cases raises concerns for rescue agencies as more people not fully familiar with the wild desert and mountain terrain take to the outdoors in mild seasonal weather. In the 2002-2003 winter season, an estimated 300,000 or more snowbirds were arriving in Arizona, according to a study by the Center for Business Research at Arizona State University.  That number appears to be increasing, but according to the Arizona Office of Tourism, no studies on snowbirds have been done in the past six years, said Kiva Couchon, the director of industry affairs at the office.  The annual winter migration of tourists includes people who come solely to...

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For Syrian refugees in Tucson, the fog of war yields to a struggle to persevere

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By NOUR HAKI Arizona Sonora News A young girl shrieks  to her mother for help. She is trapped underneath the rubble of what was once her home. The boom of the air missiles echo in the air, overpowering the screams of Samira and her children. She is scrambling to save their lives; the bombs explode through her ability to scramble. Dark clouds hang above the remnants of their neighborhood in the Syrian city of Daraa, near the Jordan border. Those are still fresh memories. After a year of struggling to survive, Samira and her children have been on a very long journey from Syria to southern Arizona. Their connections to get here were a lot more harrowing than any typical long-distance airplane trip. The flashbacks and memories of traumatic moments reverberate through their minds as they gain physical and cultural traction in a new land...

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Tombstone’s budget: The numbers don’t add up

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By JULIANNE STANFORD Tombstone Bureau Chief Tombstone is a wealthy city – or so it appears on paper. For each of the past three years, the City of Tombstone has planned for an income of more than $6 million to be spent on annual expenses such as the city council, public services and infrastructure repairs. But in reality, the city has been spending only half of that amount by the end of the year because the annual revenue is falling drastically short of the estimates. An analysis conducted by The Tombstone Epitaph of the city’s internal final financial documents found that Tombstone’s revenues have been overestimated by at least $3 million each year for the last three years, giving the city the appearance that it has more money to spend than it really does. Discrepancies range through amounts large and small, including an...

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Xanax and the new generation of addiction

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By AMANDA MARTINEZ Arizona Sonora News Gilbert Martinez is a 20-year-old auto glass repair technician who lives in Arizona. His life is typical in many ways: He gets up, goes to work, hangs out with his friends and plays video games for hours, but his driving motivation in life is to buy and take Xanax. “I basically do my work to obtain Xanax and other drugs,” Martinez said. His says his addiction started the way it does for many people. Family members were prescribed the drug and he began to skim pills from them, selling the pills at school and. over the course of four years, increasing his dose. But as his intake increased, so did his legal problems.  Around 4 p.m. on Halloween 2014, he was stopped at a DUI checkpoint in Tempe. He said he was given...

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A ‘Bear Down’ reflection: A championship season for ’97 Arizona basketball team

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By EMILY GAUCI Creative Director/Arizona Sonora News With the start of the 2016-2017 Arizona Basketball season approaching 20 years after the 1996-1997 team won the national title, three former basketball players and a former Arizona coach from the championship team reflect on the winning season.  “There were a lot of questions heading into the season…” They were a young team.  One had only played 8 to 10 minutes a game the season before.  Another was a transfer from a California community college who had never played in a NCAA game.  The starting point guard was a true freshman.  There was only one senior on the team, and he was a walk-on from a Maryland community college. You could see why coach Lute Olson had some questions going into the season. It’s been almost 20 years since they lost their last two...

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The stars at night, they’re not so bright. Deep in the heart of Tucson.

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By MIKAYLA MACE Arizona Sonora News Service The sun sets in Tucson; street lights blink on; storefronts glow. From downtown, you can see a handful of stars, and quite a bit more if you are in other areas. But where is the Milky Way in that night sky? Despite Tucson having long been known as the home of the International Dark Sky Association (IDA) and the astronomy capital of the world, the galaxy has largely faded from view in the city where the global dark sky movement began. We talk a good game of dark skies, but does Tucson really play that game? Are we losing ground, so to speak, in the quest for dark skies with less visual pollution from artificial light? “Tucson has never approached us about being considered a Dark Sky Community,” said John Barentine, program...

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Up in the projection booth, showing movies the old-fashioned way in Tucson

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By ALEXIS WRIGHT Arizona Sonora News Sweat collects on his brow, salty and profuse. He absentmindedly wipes it away with a roll of his shoulder and focuses on the gritty process in front of him. Pedro Robles-Hill looks up. The machine is still operating with no clogs, rips or tears in the mechanisms. Its loud and grinding sound labors with almost hypnotizing precision, while the heat increases to almost uncomfortable levels. He pushes forward. A glance at the time reminds him that he has only been at work for only a half an hour, with another hour or two before he can escape to a cool haven, a chair and maybe the bathroom. Those hours fly by, and before he knows it, his task is done. For a projectionist contending with the fading chore of running film in a...

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Where cars go to die (plus a Kirby vacuum, a motor boat, 12 taxidermy monkeys …)

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By SARAH BEAUDRY Arizona Sonora News  Your water heater blows, or the washer goes kaput. Maybe you are dreaming of a new stainless steel refrigerator, but don’t know what to do with the old one. It’s time to get rid of unwanted kitchen ware. The garage is crowded with bikes the kids never ride. That car out front is a junker. Who you gonna call, as The Ghostbusters movie theme asked. Well, you call someone who knows how to pick up your stuff and what to do with it. Wake up in the morning, look outside and smile over a cup of coffee, happy the trash is gone from the curb. A scrapper came by in the early morning hours, hitched the junk to his truck and headed to a scrap yard, pocketing $10-$50 for the haul. But how does...

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At the National Weather Service in Tucson, another monsoon season goes into the books

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By TAYLOR DAYTON Arizona Sonora News  A group of attentive meteorologists hover at radar and satellite screens that make a colorful collage at the National Weather Service office in Tucson. On a breezy September afternoon, with a temperature of 93 degrees, monsoon thunderstorms dance across the desert sky in what could be their last gasp of the summer. So another monsoon season was about to enter the book at the Tucson NWS.  This one had rainfall above the average of 6.08 inches from June 15 to Sept. 30. The operations center observes, records and predicts monsoon activity, and sends public warnings when storms become severe. Several meteorologists are anchored to workstations observing four or five monitors each on the third floor of a red-brick building at the University of Arizona.  All have different radar and satellite images scanning southern...

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Hip Bisbee is forward-looking, just down the road from Tombstone, which is not

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By BRITTAN BATES Arizona Sonora News “Border town” is hardly what comes to mind when you stumble upon Bisbee, Arizona. There are no Border Patrol vehicles pulling over cars. The town doesn’t have a reputation for drug trafficking, or undocumented immigrants walking in with nothing but the clothing on their backs. Instead Bisbee is a quirky, bohemian place with a Main Street straight out of the 19th century Wild West, just 10 miles north of the border — and 20 miles south of the shoot-em-up faux westernalia of Tombstone. Here in Bisbee, you’ll find street performers, not gun-toting men in cowboy costumes. You’ll find the annual parade of “art cars;” the famous Brian “Legs” Tagalog, a tattoo artist who works solely with his feet (he was born without arms) and maybe even on a sunny day you’ll see Bisbee’s local...

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While big airlines squeeze mid-sized airports, Tucson airport starts new flights to New York and Mexico

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By JESSICA KONG Arizona Sonora News Pushing back against declines in airline service that have been seen at all mid-sized and smaller airports in the U.S. in recent years, Tucson International Airport is launching new flights. On Friday, Oct. 7, new nonstop service between Tucson and New York’s Kennedy International airport will begin, four days after the airport launches new flights to Hermosillo, Mexico, on Oct. 3. The Hermosillo service starts Monday on the Mexican regional airline Aeromar. It and the New York resumption on American Airlines are the latest small scores in a game being played by Tucson and other non-hub airports as they employ aggressive marketing to bolster positions against trends in a domestic airline industry where major carriers have shifted more capacity to larger hub airports like Phoenix — where revenue per passenger is higher. Flight...

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Need to rent a goat, a donkey or a cow? Here’s how

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By LEAH MERRALL Arizona Sonora News  Instead of waking up in the morning to the blare of a leaf blower, lawn mower or chainsaw on landscape duty, why not wake up in peace and look out the window to see a team of livestock gently grazing your property and doing the exact same job? You might laugh, but in fact livestock are used for landscaping purposes all over the country. And why not? Animals are less noisy (well, usually) and more environmentally friendly. And besides, you can hire them for a spell and don’t have to provide maintenance or store them in your garage. An entire network of prescribed grazing services exists at websites like livestockforlandscapes.com, which catalogues an A to Z list, state by state (plus Canada) of providers of prescribed grazing services. You can rent goats, cattle, sheep, horses or donkeys....

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From Zeer Pot to Evaptainer, from the Middle East to Arizona, how sunlight and water can address food spoilage when electricity isn’t an option

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By NOUR HAKI Arizona Sonora News Service Everybody in southern Arizona knows what an evaporative cooler is. This technology, which pre-dated the wide residential availability of air conditioning, largely enabled a great population influx to the hotter, drier regions of the American Southwest in the 1940s through the 1960s. Now the same evaporation technique — an ancient low-tech air conditioning technology that was perfected in the Middle East during the Middle Ages — is being modified for widespread use as a way to help preserve stored food better in developing countries. “In the older days, everybody had a swamp cooler particularly in Arizona, because the cooling system works very well with our weather,” said Alfenso De La Riva, the general manager of Perry Heating and Cooling Company in Tucson. “Mexico embraced this technology by using it considerably before the...

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In the desert, a rat by any other name is still … well, it’s probably a packrat

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By ALEXIS WRIGHT Arizona Sonora News Service Don’t be fooled by the white-throated wood rat with its big, brown eyes, petite round ears and fluffy snout. This seemingly innocent ball of fuzz is a Southwestern menace. And it can cost you. The packrat, or the Neotoma albigula as they are called, can do thousands of dollars of damage to cars and homes, even in a single night. They can be infuriatingly devious, and for many homeowners the thought of feeding it to a rattlesnake is not only appealing but in some cases practical, assuming you own a rattlesnake. But in general terms, humans and packrats do not play well together. Packrats often settle their nests under the hoods of in cars, in large piles of wood or garbage, and even in attics and cactuses. In one instance, a man from Tucson...

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In plain English, Huachuca Mayor Taylor defends resistance to ‘Spanish/Mexican’

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By AMANDA MARTINEZ Arizona Sonora News Service     Huachuca City Mayor Ken Taylor says he felt blindsided by the uproar that followed his terse declining of an email invitation to attend the U.S.-Mexico Border Mayors Association because it was written in both English and Spanish. But he did not back down. In an interview with Arizona Sonora News Service, Taylor doubled down on his resistance to being addressed in Spanish as well as English. But he also said he thought the email was “spam” and that the Border Mayors Association, which Huachuca City has been a member of since before Taylor was elected mayor in 2013, “didn’t seem like a legitimate organization and it still does not.” “I never really knew I was participating in the first place,” Taylor said. The conflict began in August when he received an...

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Getting across the idea that in a desert, all wildlife is wild

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By SARA HARELSON Arizona Sonora News Service The roadrunner was strolling through in the grass, looking around and soaking up the afternoon sun, as docile as a kitten.  But in a flash, the roadrunner sprang up and snatched a lizard sunbathing on a wall, then bashed the poor critter violently to the ground, knocking it into a stupor. Then the roadrunner swallowed the lizard — whole — and walked off, fat and happy. Well, that was a lesson learned in living with wildlife and having one’s assumptions roughly challenged, as we often do here in the Sonoran Desert. Roadrunners look cute, their image as lovable scamps bolstered by the cartoon Roadrunner who comically dodged Wile E. Coyote in those famous cartoons. But people who live desert can forget that the wildlife that cohabitate with them are – well, they...

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A Tucson sub shop vending machine that attracts drug-enforcement interest

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By LIZ O’CONNELL Arizona Sonora News Not everyone who comes into East Coast Subs is there to order a sandwich.  Some customers at the small restaurant south of the University of Arizona campus go straight to the vending machine in the dining room, and pull out their wallets. The machine dispenses 100, 40 and 10 gram packages of kratom, a substance derived from the leaves of a tropical tree found in Southeast Asia and highly valued for what some say is its near opiod-like ability to relieve pain, depression and anxiety. Just like any vending machine, customers swipe a card or put $5 to $25 in cash, make their choice and out tumbles a bag of kratom. It is that simple. But it is not so simple to the people at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.  They argue the...

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TSA finds record number of guns at airport checkpoints in 2016

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By KYLE KOCHEVAR Arizona Sonora News [UPDATED Dec. 19) The Transportation Security Administration has found a record number of guns in passengers’ carry-on bags this year at the nation’s 450 commercial airports, well in excess of previous years’ gun-hauls totals, which have been increasing annually. As of Dec. 18, a total of 3,173 firearms had been discovered during 2016 at airport security checkpoints, according to an Arizona Sonora News tally of weekly data supplied by the TSA. The total for 2016 already significantly exceeds the 2015 record haul of 2,653 guns, most of them loaded, discovered in the carry-on bags of people seeking to board airplanes.  The trend of carrying guns when planning to board a plane, which has grown sharply in recent years, gives new meaning to the phrase “packing for the airport.” However, the TSA says, those found with...

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Nogalenses create an oasis in a food desert

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By CHRISTINA DURAN Arizona Sonora News (Christina Duran is a reporter for El Independiente) Down Morley Avenue, one side of the street is lined with storefronts selling girls’ party clothes and bright plastic toys. On the other side, tents and tables occupy what’s usually a vacant parking lot. Each table is laden with an assortment of produce and homemade treats, from kale and yellow butternut squash, to pomegranates, empanadas, and different cheeses. A big metal pot between the crates of food lure Nogalenses with the rich scent of carne con chile tamales. Friday afternoons, near the border that separates Nogales and Sonora, people gather to listen to Latino hits and to enjoy the food at the Nogales Mercado. In 2012 the Mariposa Community Health Center (MCHC) and Nogales Community Development (NCD) partnered to found the Nogales Mercado. Their aim...

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Sculptures for sale: Inquire within, maybe just to chat

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By HARRISON REED Arizona Sonora News It is impossible to miss James Huffer’s house, at the corner of North Beverly Avenue and East Patricia Street in Tucson’s Old Fort Lowell neighborhood.  It is surrounded by sculptures – many of them large abstract pieces fashioned out of scrap metal and wood, placed around the yard from the curb to the sides of his house.   In the gravel alongside them, there is a neat black sign with white lettering that reads: “Sculpture Inquiries,” with Huffer’s phone number printed below.  Other signs with his phone number, advertising his work, are posted at other street corners in the neighborhood. The pieces are all the work of Huffer, a 74-year-old sculptor and graphic artist. Since putting up the sign two years ago, he says he gets about a phone or two every week from...

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Helping Muslim refugee children to adapt to a new life while maintaining cultural identity

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By NOUR HAKI Arizona Sonora News Eight months ago, Besan Adnan, nine years old, a Syrian refugee from Jordan to the United States encountered a world of different people, a different language, different lifestyles. The school system and teaching methods were also different — until she enrolled at the Al-Rahman Sunday School where she felt her identity reaffirmed in a new life. Al-Rahman Sunday school is a mosque affiliated school with the Muslim Community Center (MCCT) on N. Kevy Place and Roller Coaster Rd. in Tucson. In the school, students — while they are working to improve their English skills — meet every Sunday, tos study Islamic histor and Arabic. “It is a really great opportunity for the Muslim community in America to offer schools that assist in maintaining the culture, religion and language for its young members,” said Ibtihaj Al-Na’san, a recent Syrian...

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‘Spit Hell Manuel’ on stage with Chicano rap

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By STEPHEN H. CRANE Arizona Sonora News (Stephen H. Crane III is a reporter with El Independiente) The small, crowded hookah lounge was filled with an audience awaiting a young artist’s first performance. But the performer’s flash drive failed. He had no music to back him up. “The crazy thing was that I performed acapella,” he said. “I went up there and ripped the stage. People were going crazy.” Spit Hell Manuel, AKA Manuel Andrade, may have had a rocky start as a performer, but today Andrade is making a career for himself in hip-hop. He has four albums available, and has created well over 40 songs. He grew up and currently lives in Avondale, Arizona, which he describes as pretty rough. “‘They told me, being Mexican in rap ain’t cool, so I’m here to kick doors down and...

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A national folk treasure: Tucson’s Lalo Guerrero, the father of Chicano music

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By HAILEY FREEMAN Arizona Sonora News (Hailey Freeman is a reporter with El Independiente) While crew members and volunteers haul speakers, cords and amplifiers off the makeshift stage at Tucson Meet Yourself, guitarist George Landa mingles with the handful of fans waiting in line to buy his band’s CD.  Clad in a black newsboy hat and bowling shirt adorned with flames, Landa graciously accepts compliments. He and his fellow Los Nawdy Dawgs band members have just wrapped an hour-long tribute performance honoring the musicianship of Tucson-born Eduardo “Lalo” Guerrero, known as the Father of Chicano Music. Lalo is recognized as a National Folk Treasure by the Smithsonian Institution. He pioneered a number of musical techniques and styles, becoming the first musician to incorporate Chicano slang into his lyrics. He learned this slang, or caló, growing up in Tucson, according to...

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Surveying the fish population in the Santa Cruz River

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By JESSICA KONG Arizona Sonora News Experts say there’s been a noticeably improved environment for the fish community along the 23-mile stretch of the Santa Cruz River ever since Pima County’s wastewater treatment facilities, the Tres Rios Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) and the Agua Nueva, were upgraded in 2013. The Sonoran Institute, joined by Pima County, has been working with the Arizona Game and Fish Department, the University of Arizona, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to conduct an  annual fish survey. The Living River series developed by the Sonora Institute and the county reports on the river. The Sonoran Institute evaluated the wildlife conditions of water, air, and energy. The survey team examined three stretches of the river beginning at Marana Flats, Cortaro Narrows, and leading down south to the Three Rivers....

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A mask-making workshop for Dia de los Muertos

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By HAILEY FREEMAN  Arizona Sonora News Ruben Palma carries trays of still-damp papier-mâché masks across a makeshift crafts studio. Tin paint cans, hunks of cardboard and faded tangerine-colored Home Depot buckets litter the inside of Funeraria del Angel, one of the sites for the All Souls Procession workshops last month.  Palma serves as All Souls Community Craftshop administrator and co-director for Many Mouths One Stomach, the nonprofit organization that oversees and runs free workshops geared toward All Souls Procession preparation. Many Mouths enlists the help of local artists and activists who instruct Tucsonans in creating projects to honor their deceased loved ones.  “They give people the opportunity to create and have a space to do it,” Palma says. The workshops give participants the chance to honor the tradition of Dia de los Muertos, and as Palma points out, “they...

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USS Arizona monument dedicated on UA mall for Pearl Harbor 75th anniversary

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By KYLE KOCHEVAR Arizona Sonora News UPDATE: The USS Arizona memorial on the University of Arizona mall was dedicated on Sunday, Dec. 4, as the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack arrives on Dec. 7. Story and a photo gallery at the Arizona Daily Star. Link.   And a report on CBS News. Link. A full-size-outline monument to the USS Arizona, the battleship that was the most famous casualty of the attack on Pearl Harbor that launched America into World War II,  was dedicated on Sunday  on the University of Arizona mall in time for the 75th anniversary of the surprise Japanese air raid on the base in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. The memorial and a related exhibit do not just serve to memorialize the 1,177 American sailors who died aboard the Arizona, whose crew fought ferociously to shoot down...

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A ‘dive bar’ hopes bikers can forget those Chinese lanterns

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By NICHOLAS A. JOHNSON Arizona Sonora News Back in 2013, the Bashful Bandit, a bar on Speedway Boulevard popular with motorcyclists, was chosen to be featured on a new national cable TV program called “American Roadhouse.”  The producers’ idea was to take their cameras into “dive bars” around the country, and give each of them a remodeling and makeover. As it turned out, the series never aired, and the Bandit never got its moment on television.  But it did get its remodeling. Three years later, unhappy patrons and staff at the Bandit are still trying to put their place back the way it was, before the show’s producers took it apart “The Roadhouse remodeling guys came in and just messed this bar up,” said Lisa Capri, a longtime bartender at the Bandit, adding: “This is a dive bar, and they tried to...

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